A Look at Lewis’s Poetry

lewiswhite
  • Jan 09, 2017
  • Michael Ward
  • 1 Comment

C.S. Lewis’s poetry is probably the least well-known part of his output. It is also probably the least liked part. People complain that Lewis had a tin ear as a poet. He didn’t give us verse that sings. It’s too full of knots. So they say.

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What If We Really Found Him?

heavendoor
  • Dec 27, 2016
  • Zach Kincaid
  • 0 Comments

It’s curious how time itself is celebrated each new year. We often observe moments in time and hallmark them as memories, the birth of a child or a particular tradition, for example. But time is never more centrally celebrated–worldwide–than during New Year’s Eve and Day.

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Echoes of Eden

pincecaspianinside
  • Dec 23, 2016
  • Jerram Barrs
  • 0 Comments

I want to begin by explaining why I chose this title. First, we go back all the way to Lewis’ childhood. From a very early age Lewis had loved fairy stories, legends and myths. He delighted particularly in the myths of the Norsemen – the sagas of Norway and Iceland. These stories gave him a sense of deep joy and longing for things strange and remote.

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How Landscapes Influenced Lewis

lewishouse
  • Dec 04, 2016
  • Douglas Gilbert
  • 0 Comments

My first experience with the fiction works of C.S. Lewis was with reading The Chronicles of Narnia. My wife and I were on vacation in England in 1966 when I bought my first of many sets of the Narnia stories.

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Lewis On Death

roadtoheaven
  • Dec 02, 2016
  • Robin Baker
  • 0 Comments

American culture (and Western culture generally) has a difficult time dealing with death and the dying. We often do not know how to interact with those who are terminally ill. In a culture that is all about this life, consuming goods and living life to its fullest, death is the ultimate enemy. It is the voice we hear, but we wish to silence in our culture because its reality testifies that our efforts to stay young and to submerse ourselves in the pursuit of material wealth will end in a pine box or an urn. That is not good news.

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Reflecting on Thanksgiving

lewisanddon
  • Nov 19, 2016
  • Zach Kincaid
  • 0 Comments

Thanksgiving in the United States is a time of calm before the expectant weeks of Advent. At least for a moment, the travesty and distress of the world is exchanged for feasting and consciously remembering the good providence of God. He is good, but the world is falling away. The mask of life is most certainly on the face of death. In these times of pausing, I’m more comforted with honest perspective as it is hinged upon the hope of the Gospel. So I turn to reading Lewis (and others). 

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The Art of the Thank You Note

writing
  • Nov 11, 2016
  • David C. Downing
  • 0 Comments

On the subject of thanksgiving, C. S. Lewis believed we should be grateful for all the fortunes that come our way, both good and bad. It is easy, of course, to be grateful for the good things in our lives. But Lewis felt that we should be equally thankful for bad fortune, for that is what “works in us patience, humility, the contempt of this world and the hope of our eternal country” (Collected Letters 2, 869).

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The Devil and Mr. Lewis

time
  • Oct 28, 2016
  • Bruce L. Edwards
  • 0 Comments

The September 8, 1947 cover of Time Magazine improbably depicts the demure C. S. Lewis accompanied by a fiercely impish devil poised on his left shoulder, a caricature of his infamous fictional protagonist, Screwtape, AKA, Senior Tempter of Hell.

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Attaching Ourselves to Heaven

gargoyle
  • Oct 13, 2016
  • Zach Kincaid
  • 0 Comments

We all wrestle with death. Its presence is around us constantly. It’s in us too. But three great revelations of God in the Old Testament tell us: (1) he is one; (2) he made us in his image, (3) and he seeks after us because he loves us. All three revelations bleed into the New Testament with Jesus who yells down death asking the rhetorical question, “Where is your sting?”

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